FORUM


Service-
Learning: Its Opportunity and Promise

Vol. 15, No. 2
ISSN: 1546-2676

 

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Kappa Omicron Nu FORUM
, Vol. 15, No. 2. 
ISSN:
1546-2676. Editor: Dorothy I. Mitstifer. Official publication of Kappa Omicron Nu National Honor Society. Member, Association of College Honor Societies. Copyright © 2004. Kappa Omicron Nu FORUM is a refereed, semi-annual publication serving the profession of family and consumer sciences. The opinions expressed by the authors are their own and do not necessarily reflect the policies of the society. Further information: Kappa Omicron Nu, PO Box 798, Okemos, MI 48805-0798. Telephone: 517.351.8335

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Table of Contents

Reflection Matters: Connecting Theory to Practice in Service-Learning Courses

Mary E. Henry

Abstract

Service-learning courses enable students to integrate academic study with service in the community to better understand course content through direct engagement in active learning. Reflection is a powerful educational strategy that enables students to make connections and derive meaning from their experience. ...

Service-Learning as a Value-Added Curriculum Strategy in Family and Consumer Sciences

Linda C. Robinson and Amanda W. Harrist

Abstract

An upper-level family and consumer sciences service-learning course titled “Professional Services for Children and Families” is reviewed in light of four characteristics that have been empirically supported as being crucial for service-learning to be effective: support of autonomy, matching of goals and activities, attention to relationships, and opportunity for reflection. The course also is reviewed from the perspective of a cognitive map theorized to encompass three stages of service-learning: shock, normalization, and engagement. Practical suggestions are given for instructors designing service-learning components as part of their family and consumer sciences curricula.

Creating Learning Communities: A Service Experiential Project

Susan M. Winchip

Abstract

The purpose of this article is to describe an effective experiential learning experience that occurred in a service-learning assignment in an interior and environmental design course. The format of the assignment could serve as a model for how service-learning can be used to create learning communities in higher education. Furthermore, the outcomes of the project could serve as a model for using theory and research in addressing societal problems through service-learning.

Debriefing Sessions:  Opportunities for Collaborative Reflection

Mary E. Henry

Abstract

There is an increasing call for colleges and universities to “confront disengagement from democracy . . . ” (Williams, 2001, p. 13) by examining their missions and goals as well as by committing resources to efforts that promote social responsibility. In other words, higher education is being challenged to find ways to enable university students to be good citizens, active participants in a democracy and engaged in socially responsible learning (Faculty Advisory Committee, 1998). Although students know they can contribute to a community and to others by providing service (Eyler & Giles, 1999), they are often unaware of the community assets they are helping to enhance one semester at a time. It is not uncommon for students to feel that their voices and actions have little overall impact on the well-being of their own community or society at large....

Utilizing Service-Learning in a Life-Span Course

Jennifer Chabot

Abstract

... The use of service-learning as a teaching pedagogy is rising, and a life-span course is an ideal class to utilize this technique. I will outline the key elements of service-learning for the course, discuss why service learning can be a powerful classroom tool, offer suggestions for building service-learning into the curriculum, share ideas for potential placement sites, and share three case studies of service-learning experiences dealing with various populations along the life span. Integrated throughout will be concepts often referred to as “best practices” from various service-learning scholars.

The Implementation and Evaluation of Service-Learning Activities

Diane Klemme

Abstract

Service-learning activities help students develop their knowledge and skills while doing meaningful work in their community. This article highlights the advantages of service-learning and reviews a service-learning assignment using the Duckenfield & Wright (1995) model. Class participants self-select groups, clients, and provide activities to meet their clients’ needs. Student evaluations reflect a positive response to the service-learning activity and student growth in collaborative skills.

Enhancing Academic Learning through Service-Learning

Elaine S. Voytek and Janice G. Sandrick

Abstract

Service-learning enhances academic achievement by providing reality-based experiences that meet identified community needs. Integrating knowledge from classes and previous experiences with that community need, junior students successfully conducted a soup kitchen at a homeless shelter. After realizing the need for better sanitation at the shelter, the class, with other family and consumer sciences student volunteers, cleaned the shelter kitchen and posted sanitation requirements. These experiences and student reflection reinforced their learning as well as development of professional values.

Tying Service-Learning to the Curriculum: The Design of an Intergenerational Center

B. Jeanneane Wood, Lindsey Kauffman, Shelly Schaefer Hinck, Kimber Abair, and Jamie Schramski

Abstract

Experiences gained from service-learning are redefining the purpose and outcome of undergraduate education. To this end, this manuscript will describe the service-learning experience provided to students enrolled in an interior design course at Central Michigan University (CMU). This project provided students with an opportunity to experience interdisciplinary education through course/client requirements targeting the unique needs of seniors, children, and individuals with disabilities. Participants developed the understanding that service-learning, volunteerism, and outreach have the potential for far-reaching impact.

Bridging the Gaps: A Service-Learning Project

Norma Nealeigh

Abstract

This paper discusses an intergenerational service-learning project that has built bridges between college and community, theory and experience, and college students and retired seniors. Students' stories and evaluations support the premise of symbolic interaction theory in that their self-reported behaviors were changed as a result of interactions with their senior partners.

Service Learning and Portfolios: Enhancing the Scholarship of Integration and Application

Brenda L. Bass, Howard L. Barnes, Kyle L. Kostelecky, Wm. Michael Fleming

Abstract

Service learning provides students the opportunity to realistically assess the strengths of their professional knowledge and skills while contributing to services that address community needs. Process and product portfolios are proposed as tools for integration of thought and action as students analyze their service-learning experiences. ...

 

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