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Critical Thinking and Transformative Learning

Guest Editors: Donna Kienzler & Frances M. Smith

Vol. 14, No. 2

ISSN: 1546-2676

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The Use of the Critical Thinking Process by Family and Consumer Sciences Students

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Exploring the State of Poverty: A Classroom Experience

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Promoting Critical Thinking Skills and Transformative Learning Opportunities for Future Hospitality Managers

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Transformative Learning: We Teach Who We Are

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Kappa Omicron Nu FORUM

Vol. 14, No. 2.
ISSN:
15
46-2676

Editor: Dorothy I. Mitstifer.

Official publication of Kappa Omicron Nu National Honor Society. Member, Association of College Honor Societies. Copyright © 2004.

Kappa Omicron Nu FORUM is a refereed, semi-annual publication serving the profession of family and consumer sciences. The opinions expressed by the authors are their own and do not necessarily reflect the policies of the society. Further information: Kappa Omicron Nu, PO Box 798, Okemos, MI 48805-0798. Telephone: 517.351.8335

Interested in submitting an article to KON FORUM? Papers are now being accepted for review. For more information, see our Call for Papers & Guidelines for Authors.

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Table of Contents

Introduction

Dorothy I. Mitstifer, Editor

As humanity’s ability to inflict damage on people and the earth keeps growing, it becomes more important than ever that our students learn to think critically and envision ways to improve their communities and societies. Modern communication brings world-wide events to our attention as they happen, but also bombards us with 10-second sound bites that tell only part of the truth. The pressures of everyday life allow less and less time for thoughtful reflection and meaningful dialogue. Students, as future world citizens, need to learn to make reasoned judgments in light of the facts available. Clayton (2003) quoting Minnich, offers these descriptions: “[critical thinking] is exploratory, suggestive, it does not prove anything, or finally arrive anywhere. [Critical thinkers] are open-minded, reflective, challenging—more likely to question than to assert, inclined to listen to many sides, capable of making distinctions that hold differences in play rather than dividing in order to exclude, and desirous of persuading others rather than reducing them to silence by refuting them.” They continue the search for information to improve themselves and their world.

The Use of the Critical Thinking Process by Family and Consumer Sciences Students

Frances M. Smith and Donna Kienzler, Iowa State University

As decisions related to family, careers, and social concerns (e.g., workplace ethics, personal health care, money management, child rearing practices, and environmental practices) become more complex, the need for being able to use a critical thinking process becomes increasingly vital (Pillay & Elliott, 2001; Waller, 2001). Citizens in a global world need not only critical thinking skills but also the disposition to use them (Tishman & Perkins, 1997, Facione, 2000).

Exploring the State of Poverty: A Classroom Experience

Diane K. Klemme, Judy I. Rommel

The ROWEL poverty simulation was implemented as course content in two undergraduate courses at University of Wisconsin-Stout during summer session 2003. Students majoring in Family and Consumer Sciences and Education and Human Development and Family Studies were able to simulate life in a single parent family. A pre-post attitudes questionnaire and reflection papers were used to evaluate the value of the experience.

Promoting Critical Thinking Skills and Transformative Learning Opportunities for Future Hospitality Managers

Tin Oo Thin

This article explores the possibility of guiding student's critical thinking abilities in a hospitality management class to encompass the opportunity for transformative learning. It is suggested that the case studies provided ethical inquiry based on a critical reflection of the assumptions, biases, beliefs, and values involved in their decision making. Prospective managers were encouraged to combine a moral and a financial element in their later business practices.

Transformative Learning: We Teach Who We Are

Sue L. T. McGregor

If individuals experience a transformation of their paradigm, their practices will transform. I share my own personal transformation as a home economist over the past few years, prefaced with a short discussion of transformative learning. The frame of reference of my work has changed from the principles of technical practices in a consumer rights driven marketplace to one of relational and emancipatory responsibility based on the principles of holism, peace, social justice, and global citizenship.




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